bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
From [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria:



Hi all!

It's time to sign up for the July Edition of the Pick-For-Me Challenge.

To sign up, post a comment with a link to your To-Be-Read list (be it on Goodreads, in a blog post, a google document... whatever! as long as it's publicly available). On June 25th I will close the sign-ups and assign a buddy for everybody.

Each person has until June 30th to pick 2 books (main choice + backup) from their buddy's TBR-list that they want them to read for the month of July.

End of July we'll return and talk about the books we've read.

I hope you'll want to play along! :-)

Feel free to spread the word on your own blogs - the more, the merrier :)


You know those books in your teetering to-read stack that you just never get around to reading?  This brings them to the top of the stack.  I've read some gems this way.  Join here.
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
IMG 3107 - Copy
Photos by Bojojr and Bumberjean
Bojojr and Bumberjean spent their evening at Mysteryscape, a Kansas City indie bookstore.  They enjoyed a talk by the author and then stayed for an autograph.  Who was that bearded writer scribbling in copies of his books?

Read more... )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
From my friend [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria:




Hi all!

It's time to sign up for the June Edition of the Pick-For-Me Challenge. A bit later than usual this month, but it doesn't look like the long time-frame for picking books is necessary.

To sign up, post a comment with a link to your To-Be-Read list (be it on Goodreads, in a blog post, a google document... whatever! as long as it's publicly available). On May 25th I will close the sign-ups and assign a buddy for everybody.

Each person has until May 31st to pick 2 books (main choice + backup) from their buddy's TBR-list that they want them to read for the month of June.

End of June we'll return and talk about the books we've read.

I hope you'll want to play along! :-)

Feel free to spread the word on your own blogs - the more, the merrier :)




This is a really nice way to force yourself to tackle those books on your to-read list that you haven't gotten around to reading for one reason or another.  Please join!  As [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria says, the more the merrier!

Edit:  Join here--http://kiwiria.livejournal.com/842427.html
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
From [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria:

It's time to sign up for the May Edition of the Pick-For-Me Challenge. A bit early this month, but I wasn't sure that I'd have time tomorrow.

To sign up, post a comment with a link to your To-Be-Read list (be it on Goodreads, in a blog post, a google document... whatever! as long as it's publicly available). On April 20th I will close the sign-ups and assign a buddy for everybody.

Each person has until April 25th to pick 2 books (main choice + backup) from their buddy's TBR-list that they want them to read for the month of May.

End of May we'll return and talk about the books we've read.

I hope you'll want to play along! :-)
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)


by Janet Hill

I know I have lots of readers on my friends' list, and I hope you'll consider joining a Pick-For-Me Challenge.  If you have a long list or huge stack of to-read books, let a friend select your next reading selection.

My LJ friend, [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria, wrote the following in her journal at the beginning of the year:

The last 4 months I've been part of a "Pick-For-Me" Challenge on Goodreads. The way it works is that you get assigned a buddy and then pick books from the other's "to-read" shelf that you think the other should read that month (plus a back-up book if the first choice is unobtainable for some reason). It's been great fun, and a huge success as well, as people tend to choose books they themselves have loved and therefore the hit-rate is generally really good :)

Anyway, I figured it would be fun to expand on it and have a cross-over challenge here. With so many avid readers on my flist I hope we could have a fun little group :) You don't have to have a Goodreads account - a "to-be-read" list anywhere would do the trick (Google docs, blog post, LibraryThing, whatever... as long as it's public).

It's time to sign up for the March Edition of the Pick-For-Me Challenge.

To sign up, post a comment with a link to your To-Be-Read list (be it on Goodreads, in a blog post, a google document... whatever! as long as it's publicly available). On February 20th I will close the sign-ups and assign a buddy for everybody.

Each person has until February 25th to pick 2 books (main choice + backup) from their buddy's TBR-list that they want them to read for the month of March.

End of March we'll return and talk about the books we've read.

I hope you'll want to play along! :-)

Feel free to spread the word on your own blogs - the more, the merrier :)

(PS: If you'd like to join, but have a busy March ahead of you - no worries, I'll post an April edition of the challenge come March 15th).

If you are a reader, and you aren't on Goodreads, for heaven's sake, join up!  If you are on Goodreads, and we aren't friends, look me up.  I'm bojojoti there, too.  Come play!

bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
The Effulgent Bumberjean
I was more selective with my reading this year.  There are so many good books I want to read that it's a waste to read poor ones.  Without further ado, let the awards ceremony begin:
Read more... )Read more... )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
I got this from [livejournal.com profile] kiwiria:  from NPR Books, a list of The Top 100 Science Fiction/Fantasy Books.  This category is a favorite of mine.  I am surprised by some inclusions and exclusions.  No  Madeleine L'Engle, Tad Williams,  Garth Nix, or Trudi Canavan?  No Dresden Files by Jim Butcher? The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?  And, seriously, no Harry Potter?  Why those Terry Pratchett books and not others?  
Read more... )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)


We're back home after a long whirlwind weekend of moving.  Bojoette has a great little apartment in a wonderful location, but more on that later.  On our way to Kansas City, Mr. Bojo pointed out the large cargo on the semi in front of us.  He laughed as I tried to see something, and then I saw what had amused him.

A truck driver hauling a Caterpillar: )

Book Plug

Aug. 3rd, 2010 11:07 am
bojojoti: (Default)

I received an e-mail from Amazon that [livejournal.com profile] arhyalon 's new book will be available soon.  Original fantasy served with Shakespearean characters.   

Dear Amazon.com Customer,

As someone who has purchased or rated books by L. Jagi Lamplighter, you might like to know that Prospero in Hell (Prospero's Daughter) will be released on August 17, 2010.  You can pre-order yours at a savings of $8.84 by following the link below.

Prospero in Hell (Prospero's Daughter) Prospero in Hell (Prospero's Daughter)
L. Jagi Lamplighter
List Price:$25.99
Price: $17.15
You Save: $8.84 (34%)

Release Date: August 17, 2010

bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
So, dearhearts, to recap our visit thus far to Kansas City:  we ate, visited the Kansas City Public Library, ate, visited the used bookstore, and ate (we also sat in a great many cars which we had no intention of buying and a couple with potential).  So, what to do on our last day?  We were tired of eating out, so it was a fend for yourself day in the kitchen (mmm, cold cereal).  Afterward, we headed to Oak Park Mall.  Which has the nicest Barnes and Noble!


This is the jaded smile from a non-reader who has been dragged to too many bookstores and photographed excessively (in her opinion).  The Glitterati get a bit testy with the paparazzi from time to time.
< $9 for books all weekend, honest... )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)

Bumberjean shared a favorite bookstore, Half Price Books.  I miss the used books stores I used to frequent at home.  They've all closed over the years.  A new one opened after my favorite closed, but the people running it were unbelievably rude the first time the brood and I visited,  and we haven't returned.

I was delighted to pick up Phantastes by George MacDonald and The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley.  Both were old paperbacks but the price was right:  $2.62 including tax!  Score!

Pleasure for some, torture for others. )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
It was 76° and sunny Saturday.  Snow was on the ground Sunday.  Tonight the low is supposed to get down to 15°.  The wheat crop is in danger.  The word is that it may be as poor a crop as 2007.  Thank God, I'm not a farmer.  Especially in Kansas, where, if the floods don't drown it, the droughts will shrivel it up, the hail will beat it to death, the sun will bake it, the cold will freeze it to extinction, or the winds will blow it away.

In happier news, I attended a writing class taught by Nancy Pickard, a highly-regarded mystery writer.  She was very pleasant, interesting, and informative.  Regrettably, I hadn't read any of her books, as my tastes in mysteries tend to the gentle medieval ones (Brother Cadfael, I love thee) or the proper Victorian ones (my dear Sherlock Holmes).  I may have to rectify that.

Speaking of writing, I have a 25-page paper due for class in about a week.  Have I started?  No.  I have no ideas.  I can write copious amounts of words once I have an idea that inspires me.  Without inspiration, I have no words.  Inspire me, please.  What is faith?
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
Best New to Me Author: Anne Lamott

I enjoyed Lamott's writing.  I think we would probably drive one another crazy in person, and I'm sure we have very diverse views on any number of things; still, I like Lamott as a person--as flawed and needy as any of us-- and I hope that if we ever met, we would have a mutual respect for one another.

Best (Modern) Classic: Fahrenheit 451
As an ardent lover of books and knowledge, this story resonated with me.  It has aged somewhat, but the core of the story still holds true.

Best Biography: The Hiding Place
This book was the
[info]readersrunamok selection that [info]ruthette taught this summer.  I had read Corrie ten Boom's story about 30 years ago, but it has held up well.  Knowing the outcome didn't lessen the impact of the story.  On the contrary, it was even more poignant and heart-breaking knowing what was to befall characters I have come to love well.

Best Inspirational: The Hiding Place
Bravo!  The Hiding Place wins in two categories!  As a Christian, the faith Corrie and her family display during the worst of times remains a shining example long after their deaths.  I've read many Holocaust stories by a number of people, but Corrie's book captures best how people can survive and hold onto hope in the midst of hellacious circumstances. 


Best Funny: Wintersmith
Terry Pratchett can make me laugh as no other writer.  It grieves me that he is suffering from Alzheimer's, and his creative voice may be silenced in too short a time.

Best Book for Portraying a Condition (autism): The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
This is a strange category to be sure, but what is even odder is that I had this same category last year! The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon is superior novel concerning autism. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a much simpler story and a faster read.

Most Disliked: Life of Pi
I really hated this book.  It was well written, and much of it was engaging.  I liked the beginning, and I would have loved for the author to expand on Pi's life as a child in India.  However, it turned into a fantastical allegory dedicated to exhibiting the depravity of man.   I disliked the moral of the story:  it doesn't matter what the truth is--all that matters is your perception.  I hated that the author thought so little of his readers that he had to explain, ad nauseum, his imagery.  As soon as an author begins explaining himself, I know that he either did a terrible job of writing, or he has no respect for the intelligence of his readers.  I doubt I will ever read anything by Martel again.

Best Horror: The Twilight series

Best Nonfiction: Eats, Shoots and Leaves

Best Guilty Pleasure: Stephanie Plum series

Best Science Fiction: The Host

Worst Reads in 2008: Minion, Awakening
The redeeming factors involved in those two books were the inclusion of vampires and the fact that they were gifts to me from Bojojr and Bumberjean.  Bless their hearts, and I will keep the books on my shelves for that very reason, but the award is richly deserved.  Hey, they could have been brilliant--one never knows until the reading.  And everyone has different tastes.

Introduction to Literature

In 2008, I started taking college classes, and I read the following:

I read the following for class. )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)

Elyria, our book fairy, overlooks the reference books and art books (in stacks beyond her feet) on the ledge by the ceiling.  I'm dreaming of bookshelves again.  I've been looking at a site that posts a bookcase photo daily.  The current fad to place books of similar color together to be pleasing to the eye is one that shocks my Dewey Decimal System sensibilities.  I couldn't do that to my books; it would drive me mad.  I like to know where all my books are and be able to go directly to one and pluck it from the shelf (in theory!)  However, I can grudgingly admire the artistic beauty of color-coordinated books.

Isn't this beautiful? )
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
The early teen years are perfect for an introduction to Poe:  it's one tortured soul reaching out to another through the miasma of darkness and gloom.  The junior high librarian and I became good friends, and she gifted me with a slim volume of Poe's writing.  We've been friends since:  the librarian, Poe, and I.

You can imagine my pleasure at discovering that my Intro to Literature class would start with a selection of Poe's writings:  The Tell-Tale Heart, The Masque of the Red Death, and The Fall of the House of Usher.  I enjoyed rereading the selections, and I eagerly anticipated the class discussions.  Is there anything better than talking about foreshadowing, allegory, and intent?

My classmates were considerably less enthusiastic, but I was undaunted.  I euphorically answered the professor's questions of motive and symbolism.  When he asked what the class thought about Poe, I waxed poetic about his use of language.

Then Dr. M glanced my way and said, "May I have a reaction from some of you we haven't heard from yet?"

A gawky guy mumbled, "He was a weirdo."

(I must learn to limit myself to three comments during class!  It's hard when no one else says anything.  But, then again, maybe someone will say something if I shut up.  Whew!  We are done with Poe, so I should be able to suppress myself.)
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
I’ve had a nice variety in my latest reading:  a Western, a mystery, a best-seller, a volume from an author prominent in his time, a biography, a new author, a young adult tale, a non-fiction reference, and a gift book.

17.  Hondo by Louis L’Amour

18.  The Heretic’s Apprentice by Ellis Peters

19.  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

20.  Thurber Country by James Thurber

21.  The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom with John and Elizabeth Sherrill

22.  World of Pies by Karen Stolz

23.  Summer of the Monkeys by Wilson Rawls

24.  The Unicorn Tapestries by Margaret Freeman and Linda Sipress

25.  To Those Who See by Gwen Frostic

bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
Mary Pols, author of Accidentally on Purpose, recently blogged for Powells.com about independent bookstores — in particular, one that's (ahem) near and dear to our own hearts.

June 24, 2008:
Pricing Book Lust Versus Bookstore Love

Going on book tour means a lot of time dropping by the mega-chains to sign stock, all of them a blur of sameness, cavernous spaces where books seem almost like afterthoughts to the business of selling lattes, magazines, and movies we've already seen.

But I've also been to many independent stores, among them the legends like Book Soup in Los Angeles and the sweet upstarts, like the charming Queen Anne Books in Seattle. In these places, I explored rather than searched, and felt myself growing almost physically rounder as I did so, filling with possibilities for the mind.

Always, though, there were reminders of the realities of the business. I spent more than an hour in the magnificent children's section at Seattle's Elliott Bay Books, half listening to a grandmother reading books to her granddaughter. Based on their clothing and the woman's cell phone discussions of dinner reservations, they were far from a poor family. But as they were leaving, the girl asked if they could buy one of the books. "I'll get it somewhere else," the grandmother told her. "Somewhere cheaper." She's the kind of shopper who came to mind a few hours later when I heard that Cody's Books, one of the most important independent bookstores in the Bay Area — where I live — was closing its doors for good after 52 years in the business.

Visiting Powell's this morning was a welcome tonic, then. It's the granddaddy and grandson of them all in a way: a place so thriving and sprawling it seems it has to have a future. I joined throngs of happily dazed shoppers who looked as if they were touring a Louvre where they were allowed, for a small fee, to take home the art.

Read more of Pols's post — plus daily guest bloggers and Book News, Read It Before They Screen It, and more — on our blog!

Books 7-15

May. 19th, 2008 01:46 am
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)

7. The Seven Principles of Making Marriage Work by Dr. John Gottman

8. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

9. New Moon by Stephenie Meyer

10. Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer

11. Me by Katharine Hepburn

12. Small Favor by Jim Butcher

13. Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

14. The Shawl by Cynthia Ozick

15. Traveling Mercies by Anne Lamott

Books 3-6

Apr. 17th, 2008 03:45 am
bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
3. Captain’s Fury by Jim Butcher

4. Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett

5. Unlocking the Secrets of Your Childhood Memories by Dr. Kevin Lehman and Randy Carlson

6. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury



bojojoti: (Magic Camera)
My list is considerably shorter than last year.  I was afflicted with numerous eye dysfunctions that prevented me from reading as much as I would have liked.  I haven't resolved any of those issues, but I'm hoping prayer, time, castor oil, NAC, and fish oil will do the trick.  Honestly, if I knew where to buy snake oil, I'd give it a try!  That aside, I'm grateful for the books I did read.  It seems I was even "streakier" than usual, and when I had an author I liked, I'd stick with him/her for several books.  High on the list of favorite repeat authors this year were:  Ray Bradbury (thanks to [profile] arevanyefor starting me out with Dandelion Wine), Terry Pratchett, C. S. Lewis, and J. K. Rowling.



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